Today In Energy

Today in Energy Short, timely articles with graphics on energy facts, issues, and trends.

  • Several EIA products show what’s happening in current energy markets
    on March 30, 2020 at 1:00 pm

    The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. EIA produces energy data and analysis to provide context for how a variety of energy industries serve customers in the United States and abroad. Several of EIA’s surveys of the energy sector are conducted on a monthly or annual basis, but other surveys are conducted on shorter time intervals and can provide insights into current conditions in energy markets.

  • Twelve U.S. states generate more than 30% of their electricity from nuclear power
    on March 26, 2020 at 12:00 pm

    Nuclear power plants play an important role in U.S. electricity generation, consistently providing about 20% of total annual generation. Of the 30 U.S. states with operating commercial nuclear power plants, 12 states generated more than 30% of their electricity from nuclear power.

  • Lower compensation rates for residential solar PV generation could reduce overall adoption
    on March 25, 2020 at 1:00 pm

    Electric utilities in some states have recently changed their policies regarding how they compensate electricity generation from solar photovoltaic (PV) systems installed on residential customers’ homes. An Issues in Focus article published as part of the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook 2020 (AEO2020) discusses the potential effects of alternative utility rate structures for compensating residential solar PV generation.

  • European natural gas storage inventories are at record-high levels at the end of winter
    on March 24, 2020 at 12:00 pm

    European natural gas storage inventories as of March 1, 2020, were 60% full-the highest ever recorded level for the start of March, according to Gas Storage Europe’s Aggregated Gas Storage Inventory (AGSI+). European stock levels for both January and February 2020 were the highest ever recorded for those months. Europe’s high levels of natural gas in storage are the result of a mild winter, which limited winter heating demand, and growing natural gas imports by pipeline and as liquefied natural gas (LNG).

  • Oil market volatility is at an all-time high
    on March 20, 2020 at 1:00 pm

    Crude oil prices have fallen significantly since the beginning of 2020, largely driven by the economic contraction caused by the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and a sudden increase in crude oil supply following the suspension of agreed production cuts among the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and partner countries. With falling demand and increasing supply, daily price changes for the U.S. benchmark crude oil West Texas Intermediate (WTI) have been extremely volatile.

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